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The oldest figurative painting found in caves at the far eastern edge of the island of Borneo depicts a wild cow with horns and dates to at least 40,000 years ago — thousands of years older than figurative paintings found in Europe. Luc-Henri Fage/Nature hide caption

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Luc-Henri Fage/Nature

Indonesian Caves Hold Oldest Figurative Painting Ever Found, Scientists Say

Archaeologists found thousands of drawings and stencils in a warren of limestone caves in remote mountains on the island of Borneo. But no one knew how old they were until now.

Supporters for Sharice Davids, a Democratic House candidate for Kansas, react as she is declared the winner during a watch party in Olathe, Kan., on Tuesday. Davids defeated incumbent Republican Rep. Kevin Yoder. Colin E. Braley/AP hide caption

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Colin E. Braley/AP

Trouble Ahead For Trump, And 6 Other Election Takeaways

Democratic victories ended one-party rule in Congress on Tuesday, a fact that will stop the president's agenda in its tracks unless he compromises with the other side.

Democratic Control Of The House Is Trouble For Trump, And 6 Other Election Takeaways

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Voters elected the U.S.'s first Muslim congresswomen, Ilhan Omar of Minnesota (left) and Rashida Tlaib of Michigan, both Democrats. Stephen Maturen/Getty Images/Stephen Maturen/Getty Images; Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

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Stephen Maturen/Getty Images/Stephen Maturen/Getty Images; Paul Sancya/AP

The Midterm Elections Have Made History With These Notable Firsts

The midterm elections ushered in America's first openly gay male governor, as well as the country's first Native American congresswomen and first Muslim congresswomen.

Pope Francis greets the crowd in the Vatican's St. Peter's Square in October. Many of the pope's most vocal opponents are in the United States, attacking him in tweets, blogs and politically conservative media. Alberto Pizzoli/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Alberto Pizzoli/AFP/Getty Images

Resurgence Of Cleric Scandal Invigorates Conservative U.S. Critics Of Pope Francis

Politically conservative Catholics criticize the pope for being pro-migrant, anti-capitalist and less rigid in doctrine than his predecessors. The cleric sex abuse scandals have emboldened these critics.

Resurgence Of Cleric Scandal Invigorates Conservative U.S. Critics Of Pope Francis

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Michigan has become the first state in the Midwest to legalize recreational marijuana, after voters approved a ballot measure Tuesday. Here, a clerk reaches for a container of marijuana buds at Utopia Gardens, a medical marijuana dispensary in Detroit. Carlos Osorio/AP hide caption

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Carlos Osorio/AP

Voters Relax Marijuana Laws In 3 More States: Michigan, Utah, Missouri

There are now 33 states that have legalized marijuana to some degree, and recreational pot use is now legal in 10 states, along with Washington, D.C.

Stacey Abrams addresses her supporters at an election watch party early Wednesday in Atlanta. She and her opponent, Republican Brian Kemp, are locked in a gubernatorial race that remains too close to call. Jessica McGowan/Getty Images hide caption

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Jessica McGowan/Getty Images

Stacey Abrams Vows To Fight On: 'We Still Have A Few More Miles To Go'

The Georgia governor's race remained too close to call in the early hours Wednesday — and the Democrat remained defiant in her push to force a runoff election with her Republican opponent, Brian Kemp.

North Carolina will join Virginia and 17 other states that require voters to show a photo ID to vote. A sign notifies voters that a photo ID is required at the Clarke County Schools office polling location in Berryville, Va., on Nov. 6, 2018. Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call,Inc./Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call,Inc./Getty Images

Voters Approve Major Changes To Redistricting And Other Voting Laws

Lawmakers in at least three states will have less power to draw political boundaries, while automatic and same-day voter registration is coming in other places. New voter ID laws also got approved.

Alba Nava uses an aspirator to gather virus-carrying whiteflies that have been feeding on tomato plants at the University of Florida. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Is The Pentagon Modifying Viruses To Save Crops — Or To Wage Biological Warfare?

The Pentagon wants university researchers to find ways to protect crops in the field using infectious viruses carried by insects. Critics think it looks like bioweapons research.

Is The Pentagon Modifying Viruses To Save Crops — Or To Wage Biological Warfare?

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